EXPLORING THE WORLD OF WALLETS

Japanese made Abrasus is a clever find, for those who carry more cash and coins

Abrasus’ bifold wallet mashes up cash, currency and coins in a thin bifold wallet. The attention to design detail to keep it thin creates a cool talking point, and the high quality construction and materials will ensure it will last a long time. But with only a 5 card capacity in comparison to 15 slips of cash and 15 coins, is that a reasonable balance?

(if you want to see all the features and how many cards and cash it can hold, please watch the video)

Today we are reviewing the abrAsus Slim Wallet. As we open it up, we see that it has some embossing on the simple black box. Instructions are included which are all inJapanese. It’s a good thing I can read it. As we open the wallet we can see it is a little eclectic. I spent some time living in Japan and can appreciate how this was designed. It may look fake, but this is an embossed top-grain, full-grain leather. 

Here are the features of the abrAsus bifold wallet. It is interesting how it opens by removing the top piece that gets tucked under the bottom piece. This is how it actually sits without coming undone. When you need to use it, you pull it open. There are no features on the outside. If we pull it open, we can see that up at the top, there is a little hideaway space where you can put keys. The company likes to say keys go here. There is another place for coins as well. 

Now onto the card and cash into coin and key insertion test. I was able to get 5 cards in there and the key. I got 4 quarters and 7 slips of cash. It also holds yen and euro. You could probably get more coins in here. The company says it can hold up to 5 cards, which we had, and 15 slips of cash, and 15 coins. They are referring to Japanese coins, but they are about the same size as a quarter.

For quality, this is designed and made in Japan. It’s made of embossed veg-tan leather from Japan, and has a lacquer finish on it. If we open the wallet, we can see that we’ve got great access to the cards. It’s a push from the bottom, and that’s how they come out. If we look at the coins, they are in here with snaps. They just kind of roll around, and you can fit many more in there. You also have quick access to them. They fold up and are secure. 

The price for this is $159. The wallet measures 4 x 2.8 x .51”. This is a very interesting concept, and falls into the type of wallets I would often see in Japan. They are very eclectic in what they create. And like in many other parts of the world, coins are still used pretty frequently. To be able to store them discreetly in this way is quite clever. It really can’t hold many cards. So it really is a good crossover combination between cash, cards, coin, and of course you have your key in there. 

So let’s get to the final score. For quality, a 4. Price, a 2. Features, a 4. Usability, a 3 and perception, a 4. That gives us a final score of 34 out of 50.

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